Treaty of Ghent (1814)

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The United States and Great Britain signed the Treaty of Ghent on December 24, 1814, officially ending the War of 1812. England agreed to remove all soldiers from United States territory. This included soldiers in the American Northwest. England had kept soldiers on this land since the American Revolution in violation of the Treaty of Paris (1783). England used the men to assist Native Americans, including the Prophet and Tecumseh, in resisting American settlement. The removal of England's soldiers deprived the Indians of Great Britain's much needed assistance. The loss of British support left the Indians of the Ohio country no choice. The natives could not stand alone against the United States. Within the next twenty-five years, the tribes signed peace treaties giving up their rights to their lands in Ohio.

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