Difference between revisions of "Abraham Lincoln's Assassination"

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| image = [[File:Lincoln, Abraham (4).jpg]]
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| image = [[File:Lincoln, Abraham Casket.jpg]]
| caption = Carte de visite portrait of President Abraham Lincoln, ca. 1865.  He served as president of the United States from 1861 to 1865.  He was re-elected for a second term, but it was cut short when he was assassinated on April 14, 1865.
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| caption = Carte de visite of Abraham Lincoln's casket laying in state in the rotunda of the Ohio Statehouse in Columbus, Ohio on April 29, 1865. There is a 2 cent tax stamp on the back of the card.
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<p>On April 14, 1865, John Wilkes Booth shot President Abraham Lincoln in the back of the head. Lincoln was attending a play, <em>Our American Cousin</em>, at Ford's Theatre in Washington, DC. He died the next day from the wound.</p>
On April 14, 1865, John Wilkes Booth shot President Abraham Lincoln in the back of the head. Lincoln was attending a play, ''Our American Cousin'', at Ford's Theatre in Washington, DC. He died the next day from the wound.
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<p>Lincoln's body was transported by train from Washington to his home in Springfield, Illinois. Along the way, the train stopped at many large cities to allow the people to view the President one last time. Ohioans turned out to by the thousands say goodbye to the man who had led the nation through the American Civil War. When the train stopped in Cleveland, Ohio, more than one hundred thousand people viewed the coffin. In Columbus, Lincoln's body lay in state at the Ohio Statehouse. Ohioans filed past the coffin for almost seven hours. People lined the railroad tracks along which the funeral train passed. Some Ohioans, especially the Peace Democrats, had objected to Lincoln's war policies. Nevertheless, by April 1865, most Ohioans were thankful for the war's successful conclusion and appreciated Lincoln's efforts to bring the country together.</p>
 
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==See Also==
Lincoln's body was transported by train from Washington to his home in Springfield, Illinois. Along the way, the train stopped at many large cities to allow the people to view the President one last time. Ohioans, by the thousands, turned out to say goodbye to the man who had led the nation through the American Civil War. When the train stopped in Cleveland, Ohio, more than one hundred thousand people viewed the coffin. In Columbus, Lincoln's body lay in state at the Ohio Statehouse. Ohioans filed past the coffin for almost seven hours. People lined the railroad tracks along which the funeral train passed. Some Ohioans, especially the Peace Democrats, had objected to Lincoln's war policies. Nevertheless, by April 1865, most Ohioans were thankful for the war's successful conclusion and appreciated Lincoln's efforts to bring the country together.
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<div class="seeAlsoText">
[[Category:History]] [[Category:Events]] [[Category:{$topic}]]  
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*[[Abraham Lincoln]]
[[Category:Civil War]]
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*[[American Civil War]]
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*[[Moses Cleaveland]]
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*[[Springfield, Ohio]]
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*[[Cleveland, Ohio]]
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*[[Columbus, Ohio]]
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*[[Peace Democrats]]
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*[[Ohio Statehouse]]
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</div>
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[[Category:History Events]][[Category:Civil War]][[Category:Civil War]]

Latest revision as of 13:50, 17 June 2013

Lincoln, Abraham Casket.jpg
Carte de visite of Abraham Lincoln's casket laying in state in the rotunda of the Ohio Statehouse in Columbus, Ohio on April 29, 1865. There is a 2 cent tax stamp on the back of the card.

On April 14, 1865, John Wilkes Booth shot President Abraham Lincoln in the back of the head. Lincoln was attending a play, Our American Cousin, at Ford's Theatre in Washington, DC. He died the next day from the wound.

Lincoln's body was transported by train from Washington to his home in Springfield, Illinois. Along the way, the train stopped at many large cities to allow the people to view the President one last time. Ohioans turned out to by the thousands say goodbye to the man who had led the nation through the American Civil War. When the train stopped in Cleveland, Ohio, more than one hundred thousand people viewed the coffin. In Columbus, Lincoln's body lay in state at the Ohio Statehouse. Ohioans filed past the coffin for almost seven hours. People lined the railroad tracks along which the funeral train passed. Some Ohioans, especially the Peace Democrats, had objected to Lincoln's war policies. Nevertheless, by April 1865, most Ohioans were thankful for the war's successful conclusion and appreciated Lincoln's efforts to bring the country together.

See Also