Difference between revisions of "Eel River Indians"

From Ohio History Central
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{{infobox
 
{{infobox
 
| image = [[File:Little Turtle.jpg]]
 
| image = [[File:Little Turtle.jpg]]
| caption = Portrait of LittleTurtle, also known as Mich-I-kin-I-Qua, a war chief of the Miami Tribe, ca. 1790-1812. Little Turtle and Shawnee chief Tecumseh led the Miami and Shawnee people to resist white settlers in the western part of Ohio. They successfully defeated United States soldiers led by Josiah Harmar in October 1790 and soldiers led by Arthur St. Clair in 1791. An attack on Fort Recovery failed in 1794 and Little Turtle wanted to negotiate with the settlers. Other chiefs wanted to continue fighting. The Native Americans lost at the Battle of Fallen Timbers and in 1795 they signed the Treaty of Greenville ceding most of Ohio to the settlers.
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| caption = Portrait of LittleTurtle, also known as Mich-I-kin-I-Qua, a war chief of the Miami Tribe, ca. 1790-1812. Little Turtle and Shawnee chief Tecumseh led the Miami and Shawnee people to resist white settlers in the western part of Ohio. They successfully defeated United States soldiers led by Josiah Harmar in October 1790 and soldiers led by Arthur St. Clair in  
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1791. An attack on Fort Recovery failed in 1794 and Little  
 +
Turtle wanted to negotiate with the settlers. Other chiefs  
 +
wanted to continue fighting. The Native Americans lost at the  
 +
Battle of Fallen Timbers and in 1795 they signed the Treaty of Greenville ceding most of Ohio to the settlers.
 +
 
 
}}
 
}}
 
<p>The Eel River Indians were a tribe living primarily in northwestern Indiana during the late 1700s and the early 1800s. Following the signing of the Treaty of Greeneville in 1795, they joined the Miami Indians. They took their name from the Eel River in northern Indiana. They were part of the Algonquian Indians.</p>
 
<p>The Eel River Indians were a tribe living primarily in northwestern Indiana during the late 1700s and the early 1800s. Following the signing of the Treaty of Greeneville in 1795, they joined the Miami Indians. They took their name from the Eel River in northern Indiana. They were part of the Algonquian Indians.</p>
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<div class="seeAlsoText">
 
*[[Algonquian Indians]]
 
*[[Algonquian Indians]]
*[[Greenville, Ohio]]
 
*[[Miami Indians]]
 
 
*[[Treaty of Greeneville (1795)]]
 
*[[Treaty of Greeneville (1795)]]
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*[[Miami Indians]]
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*[[Greenville, Ohio]]
 
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</div>
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==References==
 
==References==
 
<div class="referencesText">
 
<div class="referencesText">
 
#Hurt, R. Douglas. <em>The Ohio Frontier: Crucible of the Old Northwest, 1720-1830</em>. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 1996.
 
#Hurt, R. Douglas. <em>The Ohio Frontier: Crucible of the Old Northwest, 1720-1830</em>. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 1996.
 
</div>
 
</div>
[[Category:History Groups]][[Category:Exploration To Statehood]]
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[[Category:History Groups]][[Category:Exploration To Statehood]][[Category:American Indians]][[Category:Frontier Ohio]]
[[Category:American Indians]]
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[[Category:Frontier Ohio]]
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Revision as of 14:20, 23 May 2013

Little Turtle.jpg
Portrait of LittleTurtle, also known as Mich-I-kin-I-Qua, a war chief of the Miami Tribe, ca. 1790-1812. Little Turtle and Shawnee chief Tecumseh led the Miami and Shawnee people to resist white settlers in the western part of Ohio. They successfully defeated United States soldiers led by Josiah Harmar in October 1790 and soldiers led by Arthur St. Clair in 1791. An attack on Fort Recovery failed in 1794 and Little Turtle wanted to negotiate with the settlers. Other chiefs wanted to continue fighting. The Native Americans lost at the

Battle of Fallen Timbers and in 1795 they signed the Treaty of Greenville ceding most of Ohio to the settlers.

The Eel River Indians were a tribe living primarily in northwestern Indiana during the late 1700s and the early 1800s. Following the signing of the Treaty of Greeneville in 1795, they joined the Miami Indians. They took their name from the Eel River in northern Indiana. They were part of the Algonquian Indians.

See Also

References

  1. Hurt, R. Douglas. The Ohio Frontier: Crucible of the Old Northwest, 1720-1830. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press, 1996.