Difference between revisions of "Hardness Scale"

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{{infobox
 
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| image = [[File:Rough Diamond.jpg]]
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| image = [[File:Rough Diamond.jpeg]]
| caption = Friedrich Mohs, 1832
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| caption = The diamond has a Mohs Hardness Rating of ten.
 
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<p>A scale of standards against which a mineral is compared. A hardness scale is based on experimentation and observation using natural or man-made materials. Since each of the materials has a consistent hardness, different workers can repeat and verify each other’s observations with agreement. Most mineralogists use the Mohs Hardness Scale, which is based on scratching as its mechanical force.</p>
A scale of standards against which a mineral is compared. A hardness scale is based on experimentation and observation using natural or man-made materials. Since each of the materials has a consistent hardness, different workers can repeat and verify each other's observations with agreement. Most mineralogists use the Mohs Hardness Scale, which is based on scratching as its mechanical force.
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==See Also==
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<div class="seeAlsoText">
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*[[Hardness]]
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*[[Mohs Hardness Scale]]
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</div>
 
[[Category:Natural History Glossary]]
 
[[Category:Natural History Glossary]]

Revision as of 15:26, 23 May 2013

File:Rough Diamond.jpeg
The diamond has a Mohs Hardness Rating of ten.

A scale of standards against which a mineral is compared. A hardness scale is based on experimentation and observation using natural or man-made materials. Since each of the materials has a consistent hardness, different workers can repeat and verify each other’s observations with agreement. Most mineralogists use the Mohs Hardness Scale, which is based on scratching as its mechanical force.

See Also