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African Americans

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'''Charles Young''' (1864-1922) was born in May’s Lick, Kentucky, but his family moved across the Ohio River to Ripley, Ohio, after escaping enslavement. Young had a long, prestigious military career that began with becoming the third African America to graduate from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. To many, he is most well-known for his 500 mile journey on horseback from Wilberforce, Ohio, to Washington D.C. to show his physical fitness when he was medically retired from the Army in July 1917, just months after the U.S. entered World War I (1914-1918). A selection of his many accomplishments include include serving with distinction in the Phillipine-American War (1899-1902), becoming a distinguished instructor at Wilberforce University and establishing the school’s marching band, and becoming the first African American National Park Superintendent while managing the Sequoia National Park.
Sources==See Also==<div class="seeAlsoText">*[[Anthony Wayne]]*[[Arthur St. Clair]]*[[Beaver Wars]]*[[Josiah Harmar]]*[[Michikinikwa]] (Little Turtle)*[[Ohio Country]]*[[Tecumseh]]*[[Treaty of Greenville (1795)]]*[[Treaty of Greenville (1795) (Transcript)]]*[[Weyapiersenwah]] (Blue Jacket)</div> ==References==<div class="referencesText">''The African American Experience in Ohio, 1850-1920''. Ohio History Connection. 1999, accessed October 6, 2003. http://dbs.ohiohistory.org/africanam/html/.  
“Colonel Charles Young.” National Park Service. November 8, 2018, accessed July 12, 2019. https://www.nps.gov/chyo/learn/historyculture/colonel-charles-young.htm
National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. Accessed October 6, 2003. http://www.naacp.org.
 
''The African American Experience in Ohio, 1850-1920''. Ohio History Connection. 1999, accessed October 6, 2003. http://dbs.ohiohistory.org/africanam/html/.
Quillin, Frank Uriah. ''The Color Line in Ohio: A History of Race Prejudice in a Typical Northern State''. New York: Negro Universities Press, 1913.
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